Abjad

autumnotopia:

I would murder to get a Popeye’s within 20 miles of the two towns I often find myself in.

I’ve been to one here in Singapore. They’re okay. You guys have Local Boyz, which beats everything.

autumnotopia:

Everyone should go cheer for rookie team 4817, One Degree North! They’re competing in the Greater Toronto West Regional right now!

One of my best friends moved to Singapore this January and has been helping 4817 out ever since. They’re a tiny team, and can use all the best wishes that they can get!

Turns out, best wishes don’t count for much when you’re up against 1114 and 2056. But thanks for them anyways!

bunnybundy:

threshold:

Buzz Aldrin would like a word with you.

Fuckin’ A, Buzz. Fuckin’ A.


CURSE YOU ZUCKERBERG!

bunnybundy:

threshold:

Buzz Aldrin would like a word with you.

Fuckin’ A, Buzz. Fuckin’ A.

CURSE YOU ZUCKERBERG!

animesghost:

why the heck do the dumblr kids complain about high school that shit is free and not that horrible shit gets tough when ya hit college.

Probably because high schoolers are singularly bad at dealing with things. Just in general

On the Crappy Side…

autumnotopia:

Without fail, the better the day, the shittier I feel when I get home.

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I don’t want to talk where it’s not wanted, but perhaps it’s not the lack of people, it’s the place. Environments build feelings in their inhabitants.

Off-Topic Talk: Punched Tape, Split-Flap Displays, and Teletypes

Punched tape was used long before the advent of the computer. Punched paper tapes were first used to transmit telegrams more effectively and without delay. Messages were composed offline and then sent in blocks in a continuous feed. Later, these tapes would be used in the teletype machines that first on five-bit Baudot coding, a standard still used today for some radioteletype equivalents. However, paper tapes were also used in the machine tool industry. They brought about the CNC revolution. The first NC tool was made to create cross-sections for rotors in helicopters. The profiles used to be made by drilling holes at computed coordinates and then interpolating. NC made the leap of controlling the drilling and interpolation at once, going straight from the computer to the machine. This, of course, is related to the use of paper tapes in computers. Unrivaled for their resistance to EM interference when combined with their ability to loop, punched tape was used as a handy output device and as a way to loop a program. The protocols developed for punched tape no doubt gave rise to the loops and repeats of today’s computer code.

The teletype is, at its most basic level, a typewriter that can interface, via a long range connection, with a distant machine, whether that be a printer, a computer, or another teletype. They had a heyday during the batch processing era, when programs would be written up, punched onto tape, and then transmitted all at once via the tape reader on the teletype to a distant mainframe. This allowed for more efficient utilization of computer time.
But teletypes were not just for computers. They were also an important method of communication. Weather bulletins, news reports, many items such as these would be broadcast via teletype networks. The staccato beat of the teletype, possible a model such as the Friden Flexowriter, a beast of a machine that deserves its own paragraph, is embedded into our newscasts and interstitial music.
The teletype also gave rise to the telex network, a system of teletypes linked together like a telephone network. Used as a secure communication system, they were used for hotlines, at one time even on the Cold War links between Moscow and DC. Telexes were also used to send emails, back when email was network mail and networks were location-dependent. Company sites in different parts of the world would type up the emails to be sent abroad and give them to a secretary, who would transcribe them and send them off over the telex to a distant locale, where they would be printed off and placed in inboxes.

Finally, the split-flap display. Invented by Remigio Solari in a patent for an electromechanical calendar-clock, the split-flap display is that stalwart of train terminals and airport departure boards, whose flickering updates bring the world closer and make travel more exciting. Its days may be past, but for many, the cascading flip-flaps meant change and travel, an experience to be remembered.
They operated on a simple principle. The flaps were attached at one end to a drum, and hung loosely. When rotated, a small protrusion would hold back the flaps and let them fall one at a time, allowing pairs of flap-sides to display anything. Their simplicity, legibility and charm made them perfect for the departure boards that were their home.

'You Like Me, You Really Like Me'

autumnotopia:

sovtjek:

autumnotopia:

GOOD DAY, BEST TEAM.

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I only wish I could have been there.

One problem, one solution. Two words: Time machines.

Though we’re still considering the Regionals reenactment. We’ll just play Cotton Eye Joe and Gangnam Style a lot. (Oh yeah because they did that by the way. Noah and Joli were not pleased.)

Were they surprised in any way?

Ugh.

autumnotopia:

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I’m sorry.

I really am. I wish there was a way for me to apologize without seeming shallow, but I don’t know how to navigate my way around situations like these. Believe me, I never do anything (consciously) that would hurt someone. Sadly, I’m not very conscious of my actions.

I wish I could write this without the sterility of a bad obituary.

I am a flawed person. I wish I could do better by people, and I try everyday. In some respects, it may have been better for the team that I left. They got to try new ideas, and throw off my stale agitprop. My departure freed the team to be more innovative and focused. I would have just been a distraction. Looking at the positive results, I can hardly argue that it would have been better had I been there. People are quick to remember the positives of person, and many probably didn’t recall my hard-handedness, my yelling, my jerkishness. I can imagine that, had I been there, I would have been a drag on things, holding the team back with my own personal desires.

I probably shouldn’t be answering this at all.

Back in January, I really was excited about moving, and I am pretty quick to embrace the new in terms of experiences. I want to try, to see as much as I can. Looking back, the tradeoffs are not as good. I missed so much this past season, and I want nothing more than to have been with the team when it reigned triumphant.

I’m sad that my actions up to my departure may have hurt people. But in my defence, I felt that acting sad that I was leaving would have been lying. It was a truly bittersweet time. I was sad to leave the team, don’t get me wrong, but I was so excited to be going someplace new, I let that overpower my other feelings. I got carried away, and in the immortal words of a song whose name I cannot remember, “You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone.” It’s only now that I truly feel homesickness, and I crave the informal contact that so often graced my time back home. There is no one here with whom I can be truly myself, for that dubious honor still belongs only to people back home.

I wish I was better at this sort of thing.

I’m sorry if I shouldn’t have answered this. I’m sorry if this appears insensitive or mean or anything. I really wish I had the emotional vocabulary to write about these things. I just don’t have the lexicon for matters of feels.

First Orbit and Last Launch

I wrote this back on 13 April of 2011, and thought it deserved a posting here.

Everyone, remember this: 50 years ago, in the USSR, a man lifted off the ground in a rocket, bound to orbit the Earth. 50 years ago, humankind first circled our blue marble, sending forth Yuri Gagarin in the ship Vostok 3KA. 50 years ago, on 11 April 1961, man flew. Fifty years later, we continue to do so. Celebrate this. Celebrate the first 50 years of human spaceflight. Celebrate the fact that people have been born into an era when men have walked on the moon, when scientists orbit the earth, and when messages are bounced off of synthetic satellites. Rejoice in the idea that the human race has made it past our atmosphere, and begun to explore in a brighter dawn, lit by a quadrillion suns. As we grow in scale and in number, remember this: 50 years ago, on this date, at 6:07 UTC, a human being left this small fragile sphere to momentarily become a satellite of this Earth.

I wrote this back on 9 July 2011. Same thing.

Today ends an era. The final space shuttle launch has taken place. The program was not the most efficient, by far. Nor was it cheap. But in a way, the shuttle did more for our perception of space than anything else.

Many of us are people who have always known that the space shuttle existed. It started in 1981, and today ends it’s 30-year launch history. Adults exist who have never known a world without it. And that is part of it. It brought space closer. It made spaceflight normal. It helped fuel the dreams of a generation.

Good Luck, Atlantis. And Godspeed.

I do enjoy this, waxing poetic about historical events. I’m open to requests (I’m told that soliciting work is the hip thing on the internet these days.)

freshphotons:

Poster by Klaas Wynne.

Science. Clarifying, removing, and generating controversy since forever.

freshphotons:

Poster by Klaas Wynne.

Science. Clarifying, removing, and generating controversy since forever.